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Apr 2015 28

cholent competition winners!

I am truly humbled to have won the first annual Village Shul “Top Chef Cholent Cook-Off”! I am thrilled to share my recipe for the cholent that beat out 11 formidable opponents (all of the competing cholents I sampled were unique and delicious).

This Moroccan-style cholent contains no artificial or questionable ingredients… it may not help you lose weight but it’s wholesome and real. It’s also fabulously easy to make. The ingredients are placed in layers, exactly as is (no frying or browning or soaking required). So what makes this cholent so good? As with any Jewish dish, the secret to a transcendent cholent is to say “lichvod Shabbos kodesh” as you add each ingredient. Trust me on this.

Shabbat Shalom,

Shaby

 

You will need

1 c pot barley

1 c wheat berries (hard wheat)

1 1/2 c dried chickpeas (I don’t bother to soak since they cook for such a long time)

1 kg beef cheek, trimmed and cut into chunks

500 g flanken, cut into chunks

4 beef marrow bones

5-6 medium yellow-fleshed potatoes (about 500 g total), roughly chopped

1 meduim sweet potato, peeled and roughly chopped

1/2 c dehydrated minced onion

1/3 c onion powder

1/3 c garlic powder

3 tbsp salt

3 tbsp paprika

2 tbsp cumin

2 tbsp brown sugar (packed)

1 1/2 tsp chili flakes (can use pepper)

3/4 tsp cinnamon

3 tbsp canola or olive oil

1 bottle beer

9 c water

 

1. Begin by layering the barley, wheat berries and chickpeas in the bottom of the crockpot.

2. Add the meat in another layer.

3. Place the marrow bones on top of the meat and nestle the potatoes and sweet potatoes around the bones for the third layer.

4. Sprinkle all of the spices, salt and sugar over the top layer. This doesn’t have to be perfectly even as it will get stirred before serving. Pour the oil, beer and water over everything.

5. Set the crockpot to low and allow the cholent to cook for at least 12 hours (though typically I start it a few hours before Shabbos begins and I let it keep going until I serve it on Shabbos afternoon).

6. Before serving, remove the crockpot from the base and give the cholent a thorough mix to ensure that all of the ingredients are combined.

Serves 8-10

 

 

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Jan 2014 19

When it comes to chollent, I prefer to take the easiest route possible. And it makes sense – after spending 3 days shopping, prepping, cooking and baking up a fantastic Shabbos dinner, the last thing I want to do is to make another big production out of lunch. When the time comes to put together a chollent, I don’t even want to cut up onions or brown my meat – I throw it in frozen – that’s how lazy I get. I’ve been tweaking my personal chollent recipe for 5 years, and I’m now satisfied that it’s both as easy and as delicious as can be. The result is kind of a cross between ashkenazi chollent and Moroccan dafina.

Bear in mind that this is a recipe for the type of “little of this, handful of that” cooking that doesn’t easily translate into cups and tablespoons. As such, its success depends on a variety of factors – especially when it comes down to the all-important liquid/solid ratio. Some prefer a soupy (aka “spoony”) chollent, while others go for a “forky” consistency. After your first go at it, you may find that you need to adjust the amount of water based on your particular preferences/crockpot/chollent start time. Anyway, the whole process of throwing this together takes no more than four minutes – baruch Hashem!

You will need:

3/4 c barley
3/4 c wheat berries (aka hard wheat or soft wheat)
1/2 c dried chickpeas
about 675 g (1 1/2 lbs) flanken or beef cheek meat
1 medium red-skinned potato, cubed (no need to peel)
1 medium sweet potato, peeled and cubed
1 beef marrow bone

2 tbsp onion powder
2 tbsp garlic powder

1 1/2 tbsp kosher salt
1 1/2 tbsp cumin
1 1/2 tbsp hot hungarian paprika (or regular paprika with some cayenne pepper added)
1 tsp pepper
dash cinnamon

2 tbsp honey
1 bottle beer (I use a dark ale – not that I know anything about beer)
approximately 6 c water (for a soupier chollent use about 8 cups)

1. Place all of the dry ingredients into a slow-cooker, layering each ingredient in the order they appear in the recipe. In other words, you should have a layer of grains/beans, a layer of meat, and a layer of potatoes and marrow bones. Throw the spices on top, then pour the honey and beer over everything. Add about 6-8 cups of water, or simply fill the pot until everything is covered with 1-2 inches of water.

2. Set the crockpot to low, and leave it to cook about 24 hours in total. (If the meat goes in frozen, then either set the crockpot to high for a few hours and then turn it down to low just before Shabbos, or start your chollent in the morning.)

Serves 6

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May 2010 26

This aromatic brisket may be the most tender you will ever have. Forget about leathery, tough slivers of beef – this is so soft you may not even be able to slice it properly, but at any rate, it will fall apart in your mouth, guaranteed.

It is known also as the Wednesday Brisket because, if you’re making this for Shabbos, you start it on Wednesday night. But don’t let that put you off – it is so simple to prepare that it doesn’t feel like cooking at all. And really, it’s not! You just throw everything into your chollent pot (slow-cooker) before bed and let it simmer through the night.

When you wake up the next morning, with the most mouth-watering smell permeating your home, you simply plop the brisket into a baking dish, sauce and all, and leave it in the fridge for the rest of the day. That rest time gives the meat a chance to really soak up the flavours and become even more tender.

Then, on Friday morning, it’s just a matter of slicing the brisket and simmering the sauce a little bit on the stovetop. And that’s really it!

Tender, flavourful, spicy brisket… you’re welcome. 🙂

You will need:

1 large double brisket (about 4-6 lbs)
2 small onions, sliced
1 can of diced tomatoes (28 oz)
1 c water or chicken stock

1 1/2 tsp pepper
2 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp ginger
2 tsp garlic powder
2 tsp onion powder
2 tsp hot paprika
2 tsp cumin
1 tsp cinnamon
1 1/2 tsp turmeric
1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
pinch saffron threads, crushed
1/2 c. brown sugar
2 tbsp honey
2 tbsp chopped parsley or cilantro (optional)

Wednesday night:

Place the brisket in a chollent pot and cover it with all of the other ingredients (except for the parsley). Put the lid on and set it to low heat (it should cook for about 8 hours). Then go to sleep and dream about beef!

Thursday morning:

Transfer the brisket to a baking dish. If there are large deposits of fat on the meat, trim them off now while the brisket is hot. Pour all of the juices into the baking dish too, then cover with plastic wrap and put the brisket in the fridge. Then get on with your day and daydream about beef!

Thursday night:

Do nothing. Ha!

Friday, any time before Shabbos:

Use a spoon to remove the solidified fat from the surface of the sauce.

Transfer the brisket carefully onto a cutting board and slice against the grain. It may fall apart a little bit, because, like I said, it is seriously tender. (Trust me, nobody will complain.)

Transfer the juices to a saucepan or a pot, and simmer, about 20 minutes or until the sauce has thickened a little.

Carefully transfer the brisket slices back into the baking dish, then pour the sauce back over the meat. Cover and warm through in the oven just before serving. Garnish the brisket with chopped fresh parsley or cilantro.

Makes 6-8 servings.

© Shaby Heltay, 2010

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Mar 2010 04

This is the chicken version of lamb tagine, a decadently rich Moroccan stew that is traditionally served on a bed of fresh couscous. I will always prefer lamb, but substituting chicken helps lighten the dish (in both calories and cost), while still retaining the slightly spicy, honeyed sweetness of the original. Don’t be put off by the idea of prunes – when simmered long enough, they practically melt in your mouth, and give the sauce body and richness. Try to use prunes with pits, if you can find them, as the pits keep the prunes moist and tender. The honey in this dish also makes it perfect for Rosh Hashana.

You will need:

2 lbs. chicken thighs (bone-in, with skin)
2 onions, sliced
1 tsp ground (powdered) ginger
1 tsp turmeric
1 tbsp olive oil
1 c chicken or vegetable stock (or, in a pinch, water)
large pinch saffron
3/4 c unsweetened prunes
1/4 c whole unsalted almonds
1/4 c sultana or golden raisins
1 tsp cinnamon
2 tbsp honey
1/4 tsp pepper
1/4 – 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
salt to taste
1 tbsp sesame seeds
1 tbsp chopped chives or cilantro (optional)

Heat the olive oil in a wok or heavy pot. (I often use a wok to prepare this dish, because it allows me to brown more meat at once. A regular heavy pot will do just fine, you just might have to brown the meat in batches.) On medium-high heat, sautee the onions until they are soft, then add the chicken. Sautee them together, sprinkling with the turmeric and ginger, until the meat is browned.

Add the broth, almonds, and prunes to the chicken. Rub the saffron strands between your fingertips to crush them, and add this to the chicken. Cover, reduce the heat to low and allow the chicken to simmer for about 30 minutes. (In the meantime, you can throw together a basic couscous.)

Stir the chicken around a bit, then add the raisins and simmer, covered, for another 20-25 minutes – the chicken should end up very tender. Transfer the meat to a casserole or serving dish and cover to keep warm. You should be left with a pool of sauce studded with fruit and nuts. To this, stir in the cinnamon, honey, salt, pepper and cayenne pepper. Simmer gently until fragrant and slightly thickened, about 2-4 minutes.

Spoon this sauce over the chicken, and sprinkle with sesame seeds. Garnish with an additional sprinkling of finely chopped chives (not green onion) or cilantro, if desired.

Makes 4 servings

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Feb 2010 05

What I love about this salad is that it’s potato, yes, but so light and refreshing and good for you that the potatoes themselves completely lose their bad-carb stigma. Chickpeas are full of protein and fibre, and their starchy plainness so well-matched to the potatoes as a blank canvas for the dressing, but don’t let that stop you from omitting them altogether on days when all you want is a potato salad – the lack of mayonnaise alone makes this “health food” in my book, chickpeas or not. If you’re not so into cilantro, feel free to substitute any combination of herbs you fancy. I’ve enjoyed this salad tremendously with tarragon, parsley, and basil, respectively. The only absolutes here are that you use Yukon Gold potatoes, and that the lemon juice you use is freshly squeezed: the bottled version from concentrate defies the whole point of this salad, which is the bright, sour flavour of the dressing and the grassy freshness of the herbs.

You will need:
3 large Yukon Gold (yellow-fleshed) potatoes
1 can chickpeas (garbanzo beans), rinsed and drained
¼ c. chopped fresh cilantro (coriander)
¼ c. chopped chives
Juice of ½ a lemon
¼ c. rice vinegar
3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and pepper, to taste

Bring a large pot of salted water to boil. Peel and dice the potatoes into 1cm cubes, roughly (you don’t have to be perfect).  Drop them into the boiling water and cook between 5-8 minutes, or just until done. Be careful not to overcook these, or they will end up mushy! Drain the potatoes in a colander and set them aside to cool.
Meanwhile, toss the chickpeas into a large bowl with the cilantro and chives. Only when the potatoes are cool may you add them to the chickpeas (otherwise their heat will effectively “cook” the herbs), then dress the whole thing with the lemon juice, rice vinegar and olive oil. Toss to coat evenly, and taste it before adding salt and pepper, as the potatoes will likely already be somewhat salty from the cooking water. Add salt and pepper accordingly, and give it another toss. This tastes great the next day, as the flavours really marinate well together in the fridge.
Serves 6 as part of a meal

© Shaby Heltay, 2009