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Jan 2014 19

When it comes to chollent, I prefer to take the easiest route possible. And it makes sense – after spending 3 days shopping, prepping, cooking and baking up a fantastic Shabbos dinner, the last thing I want to do is to make another big production out of lunch. When the time comes to put together a chollent, I don’t even want to cut up onions or brown my meat – I throw it in frozen – that’s how lazy I get. I’ve been tweaking my personal chollent recipe for 5 years, and I’m now satisfied that it’s both as easy and as delicious as can be. The result is kind of a cross between ashkenazi chollent and Moroccan dafina.

Bear in mind that this is a recipe for the type of “little of this, handful of that” cooking that doesn’t easily translate into cups and tablespoons. As such, its success depends on a variety of factors – especially when it comes down to the all-important liquid/solid ratio. Some prefer a soupy (aka “spoony”) chollent, while others go for a “forky” consistency. After your first go at it, you may find that you need to adjust the amount of water based on your particular preferences/crockpot/chollent start time. Anyway, the whole process of throwing this together takes no more than four minutes – baruch Hashem!

You will need:

3/4 c barley
3/4 c wheat berries (aka hard wheat or soft wheat)
1/2 c dried chickpeas
about 675 g (1 1/2 lbs) flanken or beef cheek meat
1 medium red-skinned potato, cubed (no need to peel)
1 medium sweet potato, peeled and cubed
1 beef marrow bone

2 tbsp onion powder
2 tbsp garlic powder

1 1/2 tbsp kosher salt
1 1/2 tbsp cumin
1 1/2 tbsp hot hungarian paprika (or regular paprika with some cayenne pepper added)
1 tsp pepper
dash cinnamon

2 tbsp honey
1 bottle beer (I use a dark ale – not that I know anything about beer)
approximately 6 c water (for a soupier chollent use about 8 cups)

1. Place all of the dry ingredients into a slow-cooker, layering each ingredient in the order they appear in the recipe. In other words, you should have a layer of grains/beans, a layer of meat, and a layer of potatoes and marrow bones. Throw the spices on top, then pour the honey and beer over everything. Add about 6-8 cups of water, or simply fill the pot until everything is covered with 1-2 inches of water.

2. Set the crockpot to low, and leave it to cook about 24 hours in total. (If the meat goes in frozen, then either set the crockpot to high for a few hours and then turn it down to low just before Shabbos, or start your chollent in the morning.)

Serves 6

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Aug 2010 10

Warm summer evenings call for light, easy and slightly alcoholic desserts. This zesty, refreshing pie is just like a cool, creamy cocktail. As one recent taste-tester enthused, “it tastes like Saturday night”.

The recipe is adapted from the Frozen Margarita Pie in this cookbook. I use rum because I like the flavour, but vodka can be used as well. And, to suit the tastes (or average age) of your audience, the booze level can be adjusted significantly. (Hint: I often cut back the alcohol until I’ve poured out the first pie, then I mix the extra rum in for the second adults-only pie, which I mark with a slice of lime so as not to get them confused.)

Putting this together cannot be easier. Using pre-made graham cracker crusts, as I do, makes this a simple mix-and-freeze operation. Since this is a frozen dessert, the recipe here makes 2 pies. Trust me, you will want to pull that second one out not long after the first has been slurped up.

You will need:

2 pre-made graham cracker pie crusts
1 can frozen limeade concentrate (355ml)
2 quarts vanilla ice cream (my favourite pareve brand is Soy Delicious)
zest of 1 lime
juice of ½ lime
100ml rum (or more, if you like)
additional lime slices, lime zest, or whipped cream to garnish (optional)

Leave the limeade concentrate and the ice cream out to soften, about 20 minutes.

Place the ice cream and the limeade in the bowl of a large mixer and, using a paddle attachment, mix on low speed until more or less combined. Add the lime zest and juice, and mix until incorporated.

{Note: If you are making one kid-friendly pie, at this point you would pour out half of the mixture into one pie shell, cover with tin foil, and freeze. Then add the alcohol (start with half and add slowly to taste) to the rest of the ice cream mixture, pour and freeze – just don’t forget which is which!}

Otherwise, add all of the rum to all of the ice cream, mix until incorporated, and divide the mixture evenly between the pie crusts.

If you’re so inclined, decorate the tops of the pies with piped whipped cream rosettes, paper-thin lime slices, lime zest twists, icing sugar, or any combination of the above.

Cover the pies with tin foil (to protect whipped cream rosettes, flip the plastic lid from the pie crust over the pie to make a dome, and fold the foil edges over to hold it in place).

Freeze until firm (about 3 hours).

Makes 2 pies, 8-10 servings each.

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Jun 2010 17

Lime rice, fraternal twin sister to lemon rice, is a staple side dish in many south Indian households. Tangy, yellow-tinged basmati rice is dotted with crunchy mustard seeds, gently roasted almonds and cilantro like fresh, colourful confetti. For a variation, try roasted, unsalted peanuts in place of the almonds. Lime rice pairs refreshingly with spiced ground lamb, either formed into kabobs and grilled, or stir-fried loose, and piled high into lettuce cups.

You will need:

2 c. basmati rice
2 ¾ c. water
½ tsp vegetable oil
½ tsp salt

1 tbsp vegetable oil
1 tbsp mustard seeds (any type; black are stronger-flavoured, yellow more mild)
½ tsp turmeric
¼ c. whole unsalted almonds
¼ c. lime juice
2 tsp lime zest
2 tbsp chopped cilantro (optional)

In a medium-sized pot, bring the water, ½ tsp vegetable oil and salt to boil. Meanwhile, rinse the rice well in cold water, until the water no longer appears cloudy. Drain the rice and add it to the boiling water, cover, then turn the heat down to low. When the water has been absorbed (about 20 minutes), turn off the heat and fluff the rice with a fork.

In a larger non-stick pot, heat 1 tbsp oil over medium-low heat. Add the almonds and the mustard seeds – they should shimmer in the oil. Keep stirring to roast the almonds evenly. Just when the mustard seeds begin to snap, crackle and pop, whisk in the turmeric, remove the pot from the heat, and whisk in the lime juice and zest.
Add the cooked rice and toss to coat. Stir the chopped cilantro into the rice just before serving.

If you are making this ahead of time (e.g., for Shabbos), then stir in an extra squirt or two of lime juice immediately before serving, along with the cilantro. (Often, when the rice is reheated, the lime flavour dissipates. Adding more lime juice just before serving will revive it, and adding the cilantro at the last second will keep it from wilting.)

Serves 4-6

© Shaby Heltay, 2010

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Mar 2010 09

I have to be honest about the provenance of this salad, as I cannot claim it to be authentically Tunisian; rather, it is a modified, modernized variation on a simple Tunisian salad comprising thinly sliced fennel marinated in lemon juice. If you’ve never tried fennel, the flavour is somewhat surprising: it looks like celery but tastes like anise (liquorice), and is crisp and refreshing. You can make this salad as is, or you can toss it with a mixture of salad greens (frisee, mache and arugula, for instance) if you’re into “leafy” salads – just add a little more dressing. It is important that the apple you use here is tart – so don’t settle for anything less than the green (granny smith) variety. This salad is also perfect for Rosh Hashana – pomegranate adds colour and crunch, its plentiful seeds reminding us to increase our mitzvot for the coming year.

You will need:

2 bulbs fennel
1 pomegranate
2 granny smith apples
1 lemon
2-3 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
salt and pepper to taste

Begin by trimming and discarding the tough green stalks, as well as the root ends, of the fennel. Cut the bulbs in half lengthwise and wash the sections, then slice the fennel as thinly as you possibly can. Core the apples and cut them in half, leaving the bright green skins intact. Slice the apples thinly and add them to a bowl with the fennel.

Cut open the pomegranate and separate the seeds from the membranes. You can use whatever method you like, but I find the easiest (and most fun) way is to first cut the pomegranate in half crosswise (i.e., so that you end up with the stem end on one half and the flower end on the other). Then, holding one half cut-side down over a large bowl, whack the top of the fruit repeatedly with something heavy – a soup ladle or a rolling pin should do the trick. Be patient, and you’ll find that eventually, the seeds will rain down into the bowl while the membranes will miraculously remain in the shell.

Add the pomegranate seeds to the fennel and the apple. Add the juice of a lemon, then add the olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Toss the salad to coat, then allow it to marinate in the fridge for several hours before serving.

Makes 4-6 servings

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Feb 2010 05

What I love about this salad is that it’s potato, yes, but so light and refreshing and good for you that the potatoes themselves completely lose their bad-carb stigma. Chickpeas are full of protein and fibre, and their starchy plainness so well-matched to the potatoes as a blank canvas for the dressing, but don’t let that stop you from omitting them altogether on days when all you want is a potato salad – the lack of mayonnaise alone makes this “health food” in my book, chickpeas or not. If you’re not so into cilantro, feel free to substitute any combination of herbs you fancy. I’ve enjoyed this salad tremendously with tarragon, parsley, and basil, respectively. The only absolutes here are that you use Yukon Gold potatoes, and that the lemon juice you use is freshly squeezed: the bottled version from concentrate defies the whole point of this salad, which is the bright, sour flavour of the dressing and the grassy freshness of the herbs.

You will need:
3 large Yukon Gold (yellow-fleshed) potatoes
1 can chickpeas (garbanzo beans), rinsed and drained
¼ c. chopped fresh cilantro (coriander)
¼ c. chopped chives
Juice of ½ a lemon
¼ c. rice vinegar
3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and pepper, to taste

Bring a large pot of salted water to boil. Peel and dice the potatoes into 1cm cubes, roughly (you don’t have to be perfect).  Drop them into the boiling water and cook between 5-8 minutes, or just until done. Be careful not to overcook these, or they will end up mushy! Drain the potatoes in a colander and set them aside to cool.
Meanwhile, toss the chickpeas into a large bowl with the cilantro and chives. Only when the potatoes are cool may you add them to the chickpeas (otherwise their heat will effectively “cook” the herbs), then dress the whole thing with the lemon juice, rice vinegar and olive oil. Toss to coat evenly, and taste it before adding salt and pepper, as the potatoes will likely already be somewhat salty from the cooking water. Add salt and pepper accordingly, and give it another toss. This tastes great the next day, as the flavours really marinate well together in the fridge.
Serves 6 as part of a meal

© Shaby Heltay, 2009

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Feb 2010 05

This bright yellow pilaf, embellished with a constellation of crunchy mustard seeds and toasted cashews, is a staple dish in many Indian households. Adding the lemon juice at the end gives the rice a fresh, sharp flavour. It also gives you the option of turning any plain leftover rice you have on hand into a colourful, festive side dish in minutes. If you’re feeling adventurous, you may substitute lime juice and zest for the lemon – lime rice is equally authentic in the realm of Indian nosh.

You will need:

2 c. basmati rice
2 3/4 c. water
½  tsp salt
1 tbsp vegetable oil
1 tbsp mustard seeds
pinch turmeric
¼ c. unsalted cashews
¼ c. lemon juice
1 tsp lemon zest
2 tbsp chopped cilantro (optional)

In a medium-sized pot, bring the water and salt to boil. Meanwhile, rinse the rice well in cold water, until the water no longer appears cloudy. Add the rice to the boiling water, cover, then turn the heat down to low. When the water has been absorbed (about 20 minutes), turn off the heat and fluff the rice with a fork.

In a larger pot, heat the oil over medium-low heat. Add the cashews and mustard seeds, stirring continuously – they should shimmer enthusiastically in the oil. When the seeds begin to crackle, whisk in the turmeric, then remove the pot from the heat so as not to burn the nuts. Whisk in the lemon juice and zest, then add the cooked rice and toss to coat. If you’d like, stir the chopped cilantro into the rice just before serving.

Serves 4

© Shaby Heltay, 2009