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Aug 2010 10

Warm summer evenings call for light, easy and slightly alcoholic desserts. This zesty, refreshing pie is just like a cool, creamy cocktail. As one recent taste-tester enthused, “it tastes like Saturday night”.

The recipe is adapted from the Frozen Margarita Pie in this cookbook. I use rum because I like the flavour, but vodka can be used as well. And, to suit the tastes (or average age) of your audience, the booze level can be adjusted significantly. (Hint: I often cut back the alcohol until I’ve poured out the first pie, then I mix the extra rum in for the second adults-only pie, which I mark with a slice of lime so as not to get them confused.)

Putting this together cannot be easier. Using pre-made graham cracker crusts, as I do, makes this a simple mix-and-freeze operation. Since this is a frozen dessert, the recipe here makes 2 pies. Trust me, you will want to pull that second one out not long after the first has been slurped up.

You will need:

2 pre-made graham cracker pie crusts
1 can frozen limeade concentrate (355ml)
2 quarts vanilla ice cream (my favourite pareve brand is Soy Delicious)
zest of 1 lime
juice of ½ lime
100ml rum (or more, if you like)
additional lime slices, lime zest, or whipped cream to garnish (optional)

Leave the limeade concentrate and the ice cream out to soften, about 20 minutes.

Place the ice cream and the limeade in the bowl of a large mixer and, using a paddle attachment, mix on low speed until more or less combined. Add the lime zest and juice, and mix until incorporated.

{Note: If you are making one kid-friendly pie, at this point you would pour out half of the mixture into one pie shell, cover with tin foil, and freeze. Then add the alcohol (start with half and add slowly to taste) to the rest of the ice cream mixture, pour and freeze – just don’t forget which is which!}

Otherwise, add all of the rum to all of the ice cream, mix until incorporated, and divide the mixture evenly between the pie crusts.

If you’re so inclined, decorate the tops of the pies with piped whipped cream rosettes, paper-thin lime slices, lime zest twists, icing sugar, or any combination of the above.

Cover the pies with tin foil (to protect whipped cream rosettes, flip the plastic lid from the pie crust over the pie to make a dome, and fold the foil edges over to hold it in place).

Freeze until firm (about 3 hours).

Makes 2 pies, 8-10 servings each.

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Mar 2010 22

It’s that time of year again! The harried quest for a delicious, kosher-for-Passover menu is on. Luckily, one of my favourite desserts (which, hooray, is pareve!) just happens to be great for Pesach, and it’s easy and exotic to boot. I love the way the ginger in this ice cream offers a sharp, slightly spicy balance to the rich sweetness of the mango. This would be perfect as a light and refreshing dessert, just when you need that little pick-me-up before bentching at the end of a long, heavy seder.

You will need:

12 eggs, cleanly separated
1 c sugar, divided
1 c + 1 tbsp vegetable oil (not olive!)
2 ripe mangoes, peeled & diced – you want a heaping cup of diced fruit
scant 1 tsp fresh ginger, finely grated
pinch salt

Start by throwing the egg yolks and half a cup of the sugar into a blender or food processor, along with the oil, mangoes, ginger, and salt. Blend the mixture until the mango has been thoroughly pureed and everything is smooth.

In a mixer with the whisk attachment, or in a very large bowl with a hand mixer, whip the egg whites until they are thick and foamy. Add the remaining half cup of sugar and continue to whip until stiff peaks form.

Carefully fold the mango mixture into the egg white mixture with a whisk until it is more or less incorporated. Pour this into two 9 x 13 baking pans (I use the disposable aluminum ones for Passover) and cover tightly with aluminum foil. Place immediately into the coldest part of your freezer, and allow the ice cream to set, about 6 hours.

To serve, just scoop the ice cream right out of the pan. Bejewel your dessert with a few bright red pomegranate seeds or simply dust the tops with a little shredded coconut.

Makes 10-12 servings

Have a Chag Kosher v’Sameach!

 

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Feb 2010 05

Okay, I’ll admit it, I’ve got no idea about Polynesian cuisine, but these little tropical kebabs make me feel like I’m basking in the sun on a paradisiacal island far, far away from slushy Toronto. I make these when I’m tired of gefilte fish and I want to serve something festive and a little spicy as the first course for Shabbos dinner or lunch. Besides being aesthetically attractive, they are easy to make – and that, to me, is the biggest draw. You can use any type of fish you like, provided it won’t fall apart when cooked; my favourite is Chilean sea bass for its rich, buttery texture. And you can cook the fish any way you like – blitz it on the barbecue, under the broiler, or just bake in a really hot oven – it doesn’t matter. The point is that, once cooked, it’s only a matter of brushing the fish once more with the stickily sweet, sour and spicy marinade, then rolling them in a pretty combination of coconut and black sesame seeds. Sometimes I switch things up by encrusting the fish with chopped cashews instead – I’ve found that either option yields delicious results.

You will need:

8 small bamboo skewers
12 oz (340g) skinless boneless fish, cut into 1-inch cubes
4 ½ tbsp honey
1-2 tbsp lime juice
1 ½ tbsp soy sauce
1 tsp rice vinegar
¼ c. water
1 clove garlic, minced
1 tbsp fresh ginger, minced
1 tsp dried chilli flakes
Salt to taste
½ c. unsweetened flaked coconut
¼ c. black sesame seeds.

In a small saucepan, over medium heat, whisk together the honey, lime juice, soy sauce, rice vinegar, water, garlic, ginger, chilli and salt. Bring the mixture to a boil, then reduce heat to low and simmer until the sauce is thickened and reduced by about half. Set it aside to cool.
Meanwhile, place the bamboo skewers in a dish of water to soak for at least 5 minutes – this will prevent them from burning in the oven. Preheat the oven to 450 degrees. Thread the fish onto the skewers – you’ll want 3 or 4 pieces for each. Using a pastry brush, brush the fish on all sides with the cooled marinade, and line them up on a baking sheet. Bake for about 5 minutes per side, or just until cooked through.
Tear off a large square of wax paper and combine the coconut and sesame seeds in a pile at the centre. Alternatively, you could do this in a large rectangular container. When the fish has cooled, brush it again on all sides with the remaining marinade, then roll the skewers in the coconut/seed mixture so that the fish is encrusted evenly. I like to serve these, 2 skewers for each guest, on a bed of basmati rice.
Serves 4 as a first course
© Shaby Heltay, 2009